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The 20 Best How-To Geek Linux Articles of 2010 More about

Posted on Saturday, September 07, 2013 @ 22:57:54 PDT in Linux
by Raven

southern writes:  
We might be known for our Windows articles, but in 2010 we sure posted a lot of really in-depth articles covering Linux. Here’s the 20 best articles that we covered this year, covering everything from how to tweak your setup to how to use Linux to fix Windows.

more How to Geek
 

 

TIPS FOR LINUX EXPLORERS More about

Posted on Saturday, September 07, 2013 @ 22:57:13 PDT in Linux
by Raven

southern writes:  
Helpful info for those learning Linux These Linux tips are meant to provide just enough information to whet your appetite for more.
They are updated frequently and are not presented in any particular order.

more brunolinux
 

 

Linux Shortcuts and Commands More about

Posted on Saturday, September 07, 2013 @ 22:56:27 PDT in Linux
by Raven

southern writes:  
Linux Newbie Administrator Guide

This is a practical selection of the commands we use most often. Press to see the listing of all available command (on your PATH). On my small home system, it says there are 2595 executables on my PATH. Many of these "commands" can be accessed from your favourite GUI front-end (probably KDE or Gnome) by clicking on the right menu or button. They can all be run from the command line. Programs that require GUI have to be run from a terminal opened under a GUI.

Notes for the UNIX Clueless:
1. LINUX IS CASE-SENSITIVE. For example: Netscape, NETSCAPE and nEtscape are three different commands. Also my_filE, my_file, and my_FILE are three different files. Your user login name and password are also case sensitive. (This goes with the tradition of UNIX and the "c" programming language being case sensitive.)
2. Filenames can be up to 256 characters long and can contain letters, numbers, "." (dot), "_" (underscore), "-" (dash), plus some other not recommended characters.
3. Files with names starting with "." are normally not shown by the ls (list) or dir commands. Think of these files as "hidden". Use ls -a (list with the option "all") to see these files.
4. "/" is an equivalent to DOS "" (root directory, meaning the parent of all other directories).
5. Under Linux, all directories appear under a single directory tree (there are no DOS-style drive letters).
6. In a configuration file, a line starting with # is a comment.


more Unix Guide
 

 

Welcome to the Linux Knowledge Base and Tutorial More about

Posted on Saturday, September 07, 2013 @ 22:55:35 PDT in Linux
by Raven

southern writes:  
"The place where you learn Linux"

Looking for an in-depth and easy-to-understand introduction to Linux? Then look no further!

We don't just show you how to execute a handful of commands and use a few utilities. The Linux Tutorial goes beyond the basics, providing you with the knowledge necessary to get the most out of your Linux system.

more Linux Tutorial
 

 

Linux Essentials More about

Posted on Monday, April 09, 2012 @ 05:46:44 PDT in Linux
by Raven

Southern writes:  
The Linux Professional Institute (LPI) is proud to announce an innovative "first-of-its-kind" program for the academic sector, youth and others new to the world of Linux and Open Source technology.

Created in partnership with a community of teachers,trainers and experts world-wide. The "Linux Essentials" program prepares the next generation to acquire the advanced skills needed to fill increasing shortages of workers in today’s mixed IT environments. It supports government and educational authorities bringing Linux and Open Source to the classroom at much younger ages. Supporting learning and fun through skills competitions like World Skills and Euroskills. Supporting international collaboration and the development of teacher-tested educational initiatives for the classroom.

more: Linux Professional Institute
 

 

Ubuntu ... Kubuntu More about

Posted on Friday, July 29, 2011 @ 23:27:17 PDT in Linux
by Raven

papamike writes:  
Years ago, as a Network Engineer in the Air Force, I learned the importance of Univac as I studied it. My masters thesis was on the inner working of the Univac 1050II. Later Sperry Univac, and still later Linux. My forte was hex and decimal programming. But as familiar things fade away, I decided it was time for a change. Ubuntu with KDE became my passion and I am still reliant on it to perform a myriad of software task daily.
-----------------------------------------
.. excerpt from http://www.ubuntu.com/project/open-source ..

Where did open source come from?

Originally coined in 1998, the term open source came out of the free software movement, a collaborative force going strong since the dawn of computing in the 1950s. This early community was responsible for the development of many of the first operating systems, software and, in 1969, the Internet itself. Read more at http://www.ubuntu.com/project/open-source
 



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